What is the IGG food sensitivity test

IgG Food allergy test + candida

GENERAL

IgG (immunoglobulin G) test results can aid in the structuring of elimination diets that may relieve symptoms of many chronic neurological, gastrointestinal, and movement disorders. IgG antibodies are present in all body fluids and serve as a first line of defense against infection, but do not release histamine or produce the familiar immediate hypersensitivity reactions of itching, hives, flushing, or sneezing associated with classic IgE allergic reactions. In contrast, IgG antibodies may have more subtle immune effects, ranging from gastrointestinal bloating and nausea to headaches, mood changes, and fatigue. Unknowingly, people may continue to eat “offending” foods, not connecting delayed reactions to the foods eaten perhaps hours or days before.  

By measuring IgG antibodies specific to antigenic food proteins, it is possible to identify which foods may be responsible for hard-to-define symptoms. The 93 foods tested in the IgG Food Allergy Test w/ Candida include representatives of major food groups common in the western diet.  Elimination of IgG-positive foods can improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, autism, ADHD, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and epilepsy, according to numerous clinical studies.

Please note that the elimination diet is based only on IgG testing. To be safe, testing for IgE antibodies to food allergens should be considered PRIOR TO BEGINNING an ELIMINATION DIET. If a patient has negative results for IgG antibodies, it does not necessarily mean he/she is negative for IgE, IgM, or IgA antibodies.

The Great Plains Laboratory, Inc. has added Candida to the IgG Food Allergy Test. Candida problems are thought to be caused when the benign yeast form of Candida albicans or other Candida species mutates to its fungal form. Candida can overgrow portions of the intestinal mucosa, causing numerous symptoms.  Candida species can take over areas of the intestinal wall causing numerous symptoms. If allowed to grow out of balance, the toxins produced by Candida can create minute holes in the intestinal lining, leading to “leaky gut” syndrome. When Candida or its byproducts enter the blood, Candida contributes to a chronic inflammatory immune system response (CIRS). A wide range of disorders have been linked to Candida, including autism, multiple sclerosis, depression, and chronic fatigue. Use of oral antibiotics, oral contraceptives, chemotherapy, and anti-inflammatory steroids greatly increase susceptibility to Candida.

DRIED BLOOD SPOT (DBS) COLLECTION

The IgG Food Allergy Test w/ Candida is available as a dried blood spot collection for patients and practitioners who can’t perform a blood draw. The specimen can be collected from the convenience of home and shipped to our laboratory for analysis. The dried blood spot test is the same price as the serum analysis.

ASIAN FOOD ALLERGY TEST

The IgG Asian Food Allergy Test offered by The Great Plains Laboratory is designed for individuals who consume foods common to the Asian diet, especially those in China, Japan, and Korea. Analytes include mango, sunflower seeds, miso (soybean paste), and green tea.  Some of the vegetables in our general IgG Food Allergy Test have been replaced by more common Asian vegetables, such as the Shiitake mushroom, and a new food category, “spices,” has been included. The new panel also analyzes twice as many seafood items than our general test, ranging from oysters and clams to Pacific saury. The IgG Asian Food Allergy Test is a good health indicator for people who commonly eat Asian cuisine and gives a comprehensive analysis of immunological reactions to foods found in this diet.

CANDIDA ALBICANS SCALE IN IGG FOOD ALLERGY TEST

The Candida albicans scale has been updated to account for the observation that Candida-specific immunoglobulins are present in the specimens of virtually all individuals tested. The new scale is intended to provide a clearer indication of clinical significance and was established according to population percentile ranks obtained from a random subset of 1,000 patients. Specifically, the range of insignificant and low IgG values correspond to the first and second quartiles of the distribution, while moderate values denote individuals in the 51st to 97.5th percentiles. Those with an IgG value greater than the 97.5th percentile are considered to have a high concentration of Candida-specific immunoglobulins.

0-25th percentile:  insignificant
26th-50th percentile:  low
51st-97.5th percentile:  moderate
97.5th and higher:  high